Bovey Lee At Rena Bransten

We Are All Mountaineers - Entry (入), 2018, Chinese xuan paper on silk, 29 x 24"
We Are All Mountaineers – Entry (入), 2018, Chinese xuan paper on silk, 29 x 24″

We Are All Mountaineers is a new body of work by Los Angeles based artist Bovey Lee comprised of intricately hand cut Chinese rice paper. The exhibition title references #WeAreAllImmigrants and it reflects upon the uphill battle facing immigrants under the current administration’s recent policy shifts. The works in the exhibition explore facets of migration: diaspora, lineage, displacement and the rebuilding of home, and familial separation. Drawing on immigrants’ personal experiences, the show affirms our shared desire for a sense of community, societal acceptance, and belonging.

BOVEY LEE: We Are All Mountaineers
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – February 23, 2019
Artist Reception: January 12, 2019 from 5pm – 7pm

Rena Bransten Gallery
1275 Minnesota Street
San Francisco, CA 94107

Diane Andrews Hall At Rena Bransten Gallery

 Louisiana Drift I, 2017, Oil on wood, 30 x 30 inches
Louisiana Drift I, 2017, Oil on wood, 30 x 30 inches

This solo exhibition, Andrews Hall’s first with the gallery, is a collection of exquisitely detailed and masterfully crafted paintings of the natural environment. Andrews Hall is an acute observer of her surroundings, and has the intuitive connection to capture the fleeting moment a Goldfinch lands in the birdbath in her back yard, or the meditative Pacific Ocean waves as they arrive on the shore. Andrews Hall’s paintings arrest time, allowing us to exist and relish in the moment portrayed for as long as we wish.

DIANE ANDREWS HALL: in time
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – February 23, 2019
Artist Reception: January 12, 2019 from 5pm – 7pm

Rena Bransten Gallery
1275 Minnesota Street
San Francisco, CA 94107

Urs Fischer At Gagosian Beverly Hills

© Urs Fischer
© Urs Fischer

In Fischer’s work, images emerge from an odd liminal space between the real and the imagined, between what does, and could, exist. Over the past year, he has been creating paintings digitally, inventing things, rooms, and spaces using color and light. On a screen, as opposed to paper or canvas, Fischer is able to paint with light itself—moving illuminated pixels around, juxtaposing clean lines and gradients, and reflecting on the subtle atmospheric changes across day and night, summer and winter, Los Angeles and New York.

Silkscreened onto aluminum panels, the paintings in this exhibition—vertical compositions broken up into multiple rectangular passages—take on the scale of modern abstraction, yet they all describe imaginary interior and exterior worlds. Windows appear often: one glows behind a gauzy white curtain, looking onto swaying palm trees; another reflects a sunrise or sunset, with a still life on a table barely visible through fingerprints on the glass; and another frames a building across the street, where nine more windows reveal smeared and fragmented California views. In other paintings, Fischer imagines canvases hanging on walls, hit with swathes and squares of light pouring in from an unseen source. The fictional paintings and sculptures depict animals, food, city streets, or messy brushstrokes, but they—like the light—only exist within Fischer’s constructed environments; they need not adhere to any history, law, or logic.

Fischer presents characters and drawings that seem capable of disappearing at any moment. In one painting, a small orange bird sits on a branch, floating in a dark gray sky. Though its legs are in sharp focus, its body becomes a vaporous orb, glowing within the surrounding clouds. And in an uncanny sculptural ecosystem below, two motorized snails slowly wander through the gallery, leaving trails of slime in their wake. These gleaming lines, which evaporate over time, wind across the floor, uniting the other sculptures—a smoking volcano, a snowman, a palm tree—within a swirling, ephemeral landscape. Looming over the scene, the surrounding paintings form vivid, even cinematic, backdrops: a montage of disparate settings for a small, peculiar world.

Urs Fischer was born in Zurich in 1973 and lives and works in New York.

URS FISCHER: Images
Exhibition Dates: January 11 – February 9, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, January 11, 2019 from 6pm – 8pm

Gagosian Beverly Hills
456 North Camden Drive
Beverly Hills, CA

The Network Paradox At Catharine Clark Gallery

Pictured above: Roger Antonsen and Greg Niemeyer, Networks Forming, 2018. Digital print.
Pictured above: Roger Antonsen and Greg Niemeyer, Networks Forming, 2018. Digital print.

Catharine Clark Gallery opens its 2019 program with The Network Paradox, a collaborative project by artist Greg Niemeyer created with computer scientist and artist Roger Antonsen, and Mullowney Printing, San Francisco. Realized in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Internet, The Network Paradox depicts “an animated view of the evolution of the Internet from 1969 to 2019,” as Niemeyer describes, while inviting meditation on how we form communities through technologies.

Greg Niemeyer and The Network Paradox with Roger Antonsen and Mullowney Printing
Exhibition Dates: January 12 – Feburary 16, 2019
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 12, 2019 from 3pm – 5pm; talks at 4pm

Catharine Clark Gallery
248 UTAH STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CA

A Cure For Everything At Haines Gallery

Meghann Riepenhoff, Littoral Drift #1175 (Triptych, Great Salt Lake, UT 08.25.18, Lapping Waves in Windy Current on Antelope Island Causeway), 2018
3 Unique Cyanotypes, 60 x 42 inches each, 60 x 126 inches overallf
Meghann Riepenhoff, Littoral Drift #1175 (Triptych, Great Salt Lake, UT 08.25.18, Lapping Waves in Windy Current on Antelope Island Causeway), 2018
3 Unique Cyanotypes, 60 x 42 inches each, 60 x 126 inches overall

A Cure for Everything is a group exhibition bringing together works by nine artists working in photography, print, and video. Employing alternative or experimental techniques, each of the artists in the show push the boundaries and possibilities of how we picture the landscape.

“Do you know a cure for me?”
“Why yes,” he said, “I know a cure for everything. Salt water.”

The exhibition’s title is drawn from Isak Dinesen’s short story, The Deluge at Norderney, in which four strangers at a seaside resort trade tales as they seek refuge from rising floodwaters. As in Dineson’s writing, the works featured in A Cure for Everything picture the sea specifically, and nature generally, as place for healing and regeneration; a place for leisure and the implications of class access which follow; as destructive, regenerative, sublime, fragile, and ultimately essential.

A Cure for Everything: Johanna Billing, John Chiara, Linda Connor, Kota Ezawa, Binh Danh, Roy Lichtenstein, David Maisel, Chris McCaw, Meghann Riepenhoff
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – March 2, 2019
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 5, 2019 from 2:30pm – 5:30pm

Haines Gallery
49 Geary, 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA